Baked Omelet

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: MRS. M. C. LLOYD

Two tablespoonfuls of butter, 2 tablespoonfuls of flour,
1/2 teaspoonful of salt, 1 cup of milk, 4 eggs, Put the milk on to
boil; rub the butter and flour together and add to the boiling milk.
Stir over the fire for 10 minutes. Beat the yolks and salt together,
add to the milk and turn the mixture out to cool. When cold
beat the whites to a stiff froth and add them to the mixture. Turn
into a buttered dish and bake in a quick oven for 10 minutes.
Serve at once.

Omelet

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: MRS. MONTGOMERY

Four eggs, 4 tablespoons milk. Salt to taste. Beat whites
very stiff, and yolks until light. Mix together the milk, yolks
and salt. Stir in the whites, last, mixing all together very lightly.
Have ready a hot frying pan with a piece of butter the size of a
walnut. Pour in the omelet and bake over a slow fire for 10
minutes. Fold together and slip on to a hot platter. Serve at
once. This will serve 5 persons.

Egg Omelet

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:

Contributed by: MRS. HERBST

Two eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls milk, 1 saltspoon salt, 1/4 saltspoon pepper,
1 level teaspoon butter. Beat yolks until creamy, add milk and season.
Beat whites stiff and dry. Cut and fold lightly into yolks until just covered. Have a clean, smooth frying pan. When hot rub around the edge
1 teaspoon butter, letting butter run into pan. Turn the omelet into the pan. Lift the pan from hot fire and cook carefully until slightly browned underneath. Put on oven grate to dry and brown a minute. Fold over
and invert on hot platter.

Omelet

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: MRS. F. R. MECHEM

Soak a slice of bread in milk till it will not absorb any more.
Crush it with a fork and add the beaten yolks of 4 eggs, and salt.
Just before cooking add the beaten whites of 4 eggs. Cook on a
hot buttered griddle. When nearly done turn one half over on
to the other half. Serve immediately.

Egg Timbales

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: MRS. SESSIONS

Eight eggs beaten together, salt, pepper, 1 grated onion, a
little chopped parsley, 1 large cup milk. Stir all together. Bake
in timbale cups set into a pan of hot water. Serve on toast with
sauce.

Sauce:---Three spoons butter, 1 spoon flour, 1 cup milk and
salt. Melt the butter in a saucepan, add the flour and stir.
When mixed add the milk a little at a time, stirring continually
until it creams.

Eggs For Tea

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: MRS. J. ALFRED KLEIN, Butler, Pa.

A pretty way to serve eggs is to cut bread into squares and
toast. Separate eggs, keeping yolks whole. Beat whites to stiff
froth. Lay beaten whites around on toast, drop yolk in centres
of white ring and place in oven to bake for a few minutes. On
removing from oven, pour little melted butter over eggs and add
salt and pepper.

Sardine Eggs

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:

For each egg to be used, allow two sardines. Boil the eggs
hard and take out the yolk carefully, without breaking the whites
Scald the sardines, season with salt, cayenne and lemon juice;
chop very small and then pound with butter and yolks of eggs.
Fill the boiled whites of eggs with this mixture; press together
and serve, when perfectly cold, on lettuce leaves coated with apple
jelly.

Eggs on Toast

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: MRS. J. O. HILL, Pontiac

Toast and butter your bread; boil your eggs hard, chop the whites up fine and stir into butter gravy (drawn butter) and cover each slice with the mixture, then grate the yolks over the top.

To Poach Eggs

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: MRS. JOHN BENNISON, Muscatine, Iowa

Have the water well salted and boiling, but do not let it boil
too hard. Break the eggs separately into a saucer and slip gently
into water; let the whites set, then take them up with a skimmer,
and lay each egg upon a thin square of buttered toast.

Preserving Eggs

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: MARGARET BAIRD, Muscatine, Iowa

One-half pint coarse salt; one pint of pulverized lime; four gallons of cold water; mix well, and let stand three days. Put fresh eggs in a jar and pour this water over them.

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