Omelet with Chicken

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: University Hospital

Chop fine the cooked white meat of a piece of chicken, season with salt and pepper and sprinkle it over the omelet, or stir it into the egg before cooking, in the proportion of 1 teaspoon to 1 egg, as is done with ham.

Poached or Dropped Eggs

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: University Homoeopathic Hospital

From a thin slice of bread cut out a round piece with a biscuit cutter, toast a delicate brown. Pour some boiling water into a small saucepan, salt it well, place on the stove to boil. Drop 1 egg gently into the pan. At first the egg will cool the water below boiling point, and should it again begin to boil move to a cooler part of stove. When the white is firm, or at the end of about 2 minutes, lift out the egg and place on the round of toast. The egg should not be trimmed. Season with a speck of salt, a little pepper and bit of butter, and serve.

To Prepare an Uncooked Egg

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:

Beat well the yolk and 1 teaspoonful of sugar in a goblet, then stir in 1 or 2 teaspoonfuls of brandy, sherry or port wine. Add to this mixture the white of the egg beaten to a stiff froth. Stir all well together. It should quite fill the goblet. If wine is not desired, flavor the egg with nutmeg, but it is very palatable without any flavoring at all.

Milk and Egg Albumen (Cautley.)

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:

Shake up together for five minutes the whites of three eggs and three tablespoonfuls of lime water. Add one pint of cold milk, previously boiled, with constant stirring for ten minutes. Keep in a cool place. A nutritious food for older children.

An Attractive Way to Prepare an Egg for the Invalid

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:

Beat the white to a stiff froth, half fill a shallow cup with it and then drop the yolk lightly in the center. Set in a kettle of boiling water or steam until soft or medium cooked, as desired.

To Cook An Egg

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:

Let a pint of water come to a boil, drop in a fresh egg, remove from fire and let stand six minutes for a soft boiled, eight minutes for medium boiled.

Lox and Eggs (Sunday Breakfast Dish)

Originally Published:
Like Mama Used to Make . . . and More, 1986
Original Images:
Contributed by: Pearl Axelrod

3 onions
3 slices lox, cut up fine
margarine or butter
6 eggs

Chop onions. Sauté in margarine or butter. When onions start to get brown, add lox and fry until lox is crisp. Beat eggs well; add to onions and lox. Fry until eggs are desired consistency.

Lox may be soaked in milk overnight or for several hours to make it less salty and more tender.

Yield: 3-4 servings

Lox and Eggs

Originally Published:
Like Mama Used to Make . . . and More, 1986
Original Images:
Contributed by: Carol Finerman

butter
2 medium onions, finely chopped
1/4 lb. (scant) lox, cut into small pieces
3-4 eggs
1/4-1/2 c. milk

Put lots of butter into frying pan. Sauté onions over very low heat, covered, about 1/2 hour till soft and golden. You should add more butter during this time if it looks too dry. Increase heat to medium-low; add lox and sauté about 4-5 minutes. While lox is cooking, beat eggs and milk together. Increase heat to medium-high, add eggs/milk mixture to pan and mix all ingredients together. Depending on your tastes, eggs can be scrambled and range from soft (wet) to hard (dry); eggs can be made into an omelet, or served in chunks. Recipe may be increased to serve more people.

While there may be lots of lox and egg recipes, this one comes from my husband, Aaron. Everyone who has tasted this dish has declared it a special treat. We always serve it with bagels.

Yield: 2 servings

Eggs Strata-Varia-Tion

Originally Published:
Like Mama Used to Make . . . and More, 1986
Original Images:
Contributed by: Phyllis Herzig

9 slices challah
9 eggs, beaten
3 c. milk
1 1/2 t. dry mustard
1 t. salt
pepper to taste
2 T. white wine (optional)
3/4 lb. grated Swiss and Cheddar cheese
Parmesan cheese

Cut buttered challah in 1" cubes (optional: crust off). Layer cubes in 9 x 13" glass plan. Combine eggs, milk, mustard, salt, pepper and white wine; pour over the bread. Top with the grated cheeses and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Cover and refrigerate several hours or overnight. Bake at 325° for 25 minutes. (May be frozen at this point.) Then continue baking at 300° for 30 minutes.

Variations: Add sautéed mushrooms and/or onions; chopped spinach.

This is a composite recipe of variations; a favorite of Ann Arbor's community brunches.

Yield: 15-20 squares

Shirred Eggs a La Russe

Originally Published:
Like Mama Used to Make . . . and More, 1986
Original Images:
Contributed by: Shira Klein

butter (or margarine)
6 T. fresh bread crumbs
12 slices (1/2 lb.) Swiss cheese
6 large tomato slices
3/4 c. cream (or milk)
6-12 * eggs
1/4 t. salt
1/8 t. pepper
1/8 t. paprika
2 T. Parmesan cheese
thyme (optional)

Butter bottom and sides of 6 ramekins. Sprinkle bread crumbs on bottom. Cover each with Swiss cheese (2 slices). Top each with tomato slice, thyme, 1 tablespoon cream,*1-2 eggs, spices, and 1 teaspoon Parmesan. Bake uncovered for 20 minutes at 350°.

Elegant and easy.

Yield: 6 servings

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