ARROWROOT

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

This is very nourishing and light, either for invalids or infants; make it with milk or water---put a pint of either into a stew-pan, make it boiling hot, add a saltspoonful of salt, put a heaped teaspoonful of ground Bermuda arrowroot into a cup, make it smooth with cold milk, stir it into the stew-pan, and let it simmer for two or three minutes; then turn it into a bowl, sweeten and grate nutmeg over, if liked; should it be preferred thin, use less arrowroot. This should be made only as much as is wanted at a time, since it will become as thin as water if heated over.

TO MAKE GRUEL

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

One tablespoonful of Robinson's patent groats, two tablespoonful of cold water, one pint of boiling water. Mix the prepared groats smoothly with the cold water in a basin; pour over them the boiling water, stirring it all the time. Put it into a very clean saucepan; boil the gruel for ten minutes, keeping it well stirred; sweeten to taste, and serve. It may be flavored with a small piece of lemon-peel, by boiling it in the gruel, or a little grated nutmeg, may be put in; but in these matters the taste of the patient should be consulted. Pour the gruel in a tumbler and serve. When wine is allowed to the invalid, two tablespoonful of sherry or port make this preparation very nice. In cases of colds, the same quantity of spirits is sometimes added instead of wine.

MUTTON BROTH

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Mutton Broth is frequently ordered as a preparation for invalids. For the sick-room such broth must be made as plainly as possible, and so as to secure the juice of the meat. Boil slowly a couple of pounds of lean mutton for two hours, skim it very carefully as it simmers and do not put in very much salt. If the doctor permits, some vegetable as seasoning may be added, and for some broths a little fine barley or rice is added.

LEMONADE FOR INVALIDS

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

One half a lemon, lump sugar to taste, one pint of boiling water. Pare off the rind of the lemon thinly; cut the lemon into two or three thick slices, and remove as much as possible of the white outside pith, and all the pips. Put the slices of lemon, the peel, and lump-sugar into a jug; pour over the boiling water; cover it closely, and in two hours it will be fit to drink. It should either be strained or poured off from the sediment.

CHICKEN BROTH

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Half fowl, or the inferior joints of a whole one, one quart of water, one blade of mace, half onion, a small bunch of sweet herbs, salt to taste, ten peppercorns. If a young one be used for this broth, the inferior joints may be put in the broth, and the best pieces reserved for dressing in some other manner. Put the fowl into a saucepan, with all the ingredients, and simmer gently for one and a half hours, carefully skimming the broth well. When done, strain, and put by in a cool place until wanted; then take all the fat off the top, warm up as much as may be required, and serve. This broth is, of course, only for those invalids whose stomachs are strong enough to digest it, with a flavoring of herbs, etc. It may be made in the same manner as beef-tea, with water and salt only; but the preparation will be but tasteless and insipid. When the invalid cannot digest this chicken broth with the flavoring, we would recommend plain beef-tea in preference to plain chicken tea, which it would be without the addition of herbs, onions, etc.

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