Gail's Basic Fruit-Flavored Ice Cream

Originally Published:
Fare Thee Well II, 1980
Original Images:
Contributed by: Lydia Richardson Bates

2 c. half and half
Sugar to taste (for strawberries use 1 c. sugar to 4 c. puree)
2 c. whipping cream
4 c. peeled fruit (strawberries peaches, or whatever)

Freeze in ice cream freezer (salt to ice ratio 1:8).

Carolyn Smith's Herb Butter

Originally Published:
Fare Thee Well II, 1980
Original Images:
Contributed by: Lydia Richardson Bates

1 stick butter
2 pinches basil
Freshly ground pepper
Marjoram

Soften butter and add seasonings. Brush on French bread that has been sliced horizontally. Broil until bubbly.

One reason why a dog is such a lovable creature is that his tail wags instead of his tongue.

DISH OF SNOWWHIPPED CREAM

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

To the whites of three eggs beaten to a froth, add a pint of cream and four tablespoonfuls of sweet wine, with three of fine white sugar and a teaspoonful of extract of lemon or vanilla; whip it to a froth and serve in a glass dish; serve jelly or jam with it. Or lay lady-fingers or sliced spongecake in a glass dish, put spoonfuls of jelly or jam over, and heap the snow upon it.

WHIPPED CREAM

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Mix one pint of cream with nine tablespoons of fine sugar and one gill of wine in a large bowl; whip these with the cream dasher, and as the froth rises, skim into the dish in which it is to be served. Fill the dish full to the top, and ornament with kisses or macaroons.

ITALIAN CREAM

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Take one quart of cream, one pint of milk sweetened very sweet, and highly seasoned with sherry wine and vanilla; beat it with a whip dasher, and remove the froth as it rises, until it is all converted into froth. Have ready one box of Cox's sparkling gelatin dissolved in a little warm water; set your frothed cream into a tub of ice, pour the gelatin into it, and stir constantly until it thickens, then pour into molds, and set in a cool place.

SWISS CREAM

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

One quarter pound of macaroons or six small sponge-cakes, sherry, one pint of cream, five ounces of lump sugar, two large tablespoonfuls of arrowroot, the rind of one lemon, the juice of half lemon, three tablespoonfuls of milk. Lay the macaroons or sponge-cakes in a glass dish, and pour over them as much sherry as will cover them, or sufficient to soak them well. Put the cream into a lined saucepan, with the sugar and lemon rind, and let it remain by the side of the fire until the cream is well flavored, then take out the lemon-rind. Mix the arrowroot smoothly with the cold milk; add this to the cream, and let it boil gently for about three minutes, keeping it well stirred. Take it off the fire, stir till nearly cold, when add the lemon-juice, and pour the whole over the cakes. Garnish the cream with strips of angelica, or candied citron cut thin, or bright-colored jelly or preserve. This cream is exceedingly delicious, flavored with vanilla instead of lemon: when this flavoring is used, the sherry may be omitted, and the mixture poured over the dry cakes.

BUTTER IN HASTE, FROM WINTER CREAM, OR FROM THE MILK OF ONE COW

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Take milk fresh from the cow, strain it into clean pans, set it over a gentle fire until it is scalding hot; do not let it boil; then set it aside; when it is cold skim off the cream; the milk will still be fit for any ordinary use; when you have enough cream, put it into a clean earthen basin; beat it with a wooden spoon until the butter is made, which will not be long; then take it from the milk and work it with a little cold water, until it is free from milk, then drain off the water, put a small tablespoonful of fine salt to each pound of butter, and work it in. A small teaspoonful of fine white sugar, worked in with the salt, will be found an improvement---sugar is a great preservative. Make the butter in a roll; cover it with a bit of muslin, and keep it in a cool place. This receipt was obtained from one who practiced it for several winters.

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