Delicious Caramel 101 with Keegan Rodgers

Wednesday October 4, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Secret Lab

Keegan C. Rodgers, Head Baker at the People's Food Co-Op, leads this lively workshop on how to make perfect caramel.

In this class, students will learn how to make various types of caramel, how to safely cook with hot sugar, and how to make brittles. This is a demo workshop and attendees won't be making their own caramel, but will learn what they need to know to do it at home. You will get to taste the caramel sauce and take some home!

This event is a partnership with the People's Food Co-Op and part of an ongoing baking series.

Ceres: Exploring the Dwarf Planet with Jennifer German

Sunday October 8, 2017: 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm -- Westgate Branch: West Side Room

This event is intended for grade 3 - adult

Jennifer German, Ann Arbor’s own NASA JPL Solar System Ambassador, will talk about the dwarf planet Ceres and what NASA’s Dawn spacecraft has been up to since it launched in September of 2007.

Ever wonder why Ceres was ignored for so long? Is there water on Ceres? What exactly is a dwarf planet? And why was Ceres elevated from asteroid to dwarf planet while Pluto was demoted? Come and find out!

There will definitely be cool pictures from NASA and you might even get to be a planet as part of a live demonstration!

Finding Funding For College

Tuesday October 10, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for grade 9 - adult

U-M Foundations and Grants Librarian Paul Barrow presents a workshop for high schoolers, their parents, and anyone seeking funding for college.

Learn about a variety of specialized web resources, how to articulate a plan of study, identify potential funders, apply for relevant educational grants, and compare free Web resources and subscription-based services.

This program will be repeated on Tuesday, November 14.

Raw Vegan Fall Detox

Tuesday October 10, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

Learn a safe and powerful raw vegan cleansing and detoxifying program you can start today.

Ellen Livingston is a certified yoga teacher and has benefited from a raw vegan diet since 2002. Ellen offers yoga and raw food classes in the community and at her home on 5 acres in Ann Arbor. Ellen also offers life coaching and health retreats.

This event is cosponsored by the People's Food Co-Op.

Savory Holiday Potluck Ideas with Keegan Rodgers!

Wednesday October 11, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Westgate Branch: West Side Room

Keegan C. Rodgers, Head Baker at the People's Food Co-Op, leads lively workshop on learning some new dishes to share as we head into holiday potluck season! Freshen up your cooking repertoire and learn some new recipes just in time for this busy season.

This event is cosponsored by the People's Food Co-Op and is part of an ongoing baking series.

Discriminating Taste: How Class Anxiety Created The American Food Revolution

Sunday October 15, 2017: 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm -- Malletts Creek Branch: Program Room

A provocative look at contemporary food culture, Margot Finn’s new book Discriminating Taste: How Class Anxiety Created The American Food Revolution critically examines cultural touchstones from Ratatouille to The Biggest Loser, identifying how "good food" is conflated with high status.

Drawing historical parallels with the Gilded Age, Margot Finn, Ph.D. and Lecturer, University Courses Division at the University of Michigan, argues that the rise of gourmet, ethnic, diet, and organic foods must be understood in tandem with the ever-widening income inequality gap.

This event includes a book signing and books will be for sale.

This program is presented in partnership with the Culinary Historians of Ann Arbor, which was founded in 1983 by Jan Longone and friends and is an organization of scholars, cooks, food writers, nutritionists, collectors, students, and others interested in the study of culinary history and gastronomy.

Author Drew Philp Discusses His Book "A $500 House: Rebuilding an Abandoned House and an American City"

Monday October 16, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

Drew Philp’s debut memoir A $500 House in Detroit: Rebuilding an Abandoned Home and an American City grew out of Philp’s Buzzfeed essay, “Why I Bought a House in Detroit for $500,” which received nearly 2 million views and was named one of “100 Exceptional Pieces of Journalism” by The Atlantic. His story is a transparent look into the struggle, pain, joy, and hope of what Detroit, and by extension the American city of the twenty-first century, is going to become.

Disenchanted with the privilege he saw as a University of Michigan student from a blue-collar background, Philp moved to Detroit in 2008; a year later, at the age of twenty-three, he bought a ruined house for an astonishing $500. Now he tells the story of how he grew from a naïve college student to a resident and homeowner, fighting to protect, grow, and add to the city of Detroit without overwriting its unique character. Philp shows us Detroit’s complicated mix of gentrification, race, and class, while he attempts to find his footing in the city, the country, and his own generation.

Drew Philp’s work has appeared in publications including BuzzFeed, The Guardian and The Detroit Free Press, among others. His essays and reporting have appeared in books and collections in the United States and Europe, in English and in translation, including the forthcoming "Why Detroit Matters: Decline, Renewal, and Hope in a Divided City." In addition to writing, Drew has hitchhiked across the United States; taught writing, literature, and theater extensively in prisons and juvenile institutions; and is a graduate of the New England Literature program. He is 30 years old and lives in Detroit with his dog, Gratiot.

This event includes a book signing and books will be for sale.

Funding for Nonprofits

Wednesday October 18, 2017: 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm -- Westgate Branch: West Side Room

Looking to up your grant-seeking skills for your community non-profit organization? Help your non-profit by attending this hands-on workshop led by U-M Foundations and Grants Librarian Paul Barrow.

Discover the online resources that can assist you in getting operating and programmatic grants for your non-profit. Additionally, there will be discussion about matching sponsor and nonprofit priorities and resources to help with proposal writing.

Smell & Tell | Haute Skank: An Olfactory Menagerie of Animalics in Perfumery

Wednesday October 18, 2017: 6:30 pm to 8:45 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

Musk, ambergris, civet, and castoreum are historic ingredients used in perfumery. Whether they purr, hiss, or roar depends on the dose. They are generally used as fixatives to support the structure of a perfume and leave nothing to offend in their wake.

Character is another issue when it comes to animalic ingredients as many contain intimate odors that are polarizing in Western culture. We’ll smash this cultural relic to bits at the Haute Skank Smell & Tell, where synthetic and humanely derived animalics will be experienced for the purpose of understanding their alchemical effects in a perfume formula.

We will also investigate plant-based animalics like Black currant bud, cumin, and costus. Some of these materials evoke intimate human aromas, and remind us that a short line occupies the space between the perfumes of intimacy and animal archetypes.

The Smell and Tell series of lectures is led by Michelle Krell Kydd, a trained nose in flavors and fragrance who shares her passion for gastronomy and the perfume arts on Glass Petal Smoke. The Smell and Tell series debuted at the Ann Arbor District Library in 2012 and is ongoing.

From Stigma to Strength: Rethinking How We Do Diversity

Wednesday October 18, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Attempts at enhancing diversity often begin with a notion of enhancing tolerance for a minority group, resulting in ongoing senses of both disenfranchisement by the minority group and resentment by members of the dominant group.

Join Mira Charlotte Krishnan as she examines opportunities to move from reactive to strategic to a new kind of essential diversity approach by examining the rise of the multicultural workplace, the rise of autistic people and in the world of work, the rise of women and gender and sexual diversity.

Reactive diversity increases fairness while producing existing outcomes. Strategic diversity optimizes those existing outcomes.

The goal of essential diversity, however, is to enable new outcomes altogether. These outcomes are only identified via co-creation among diverse groups, and are only possible when diversity is not a tool or a fundamental principle, but the source or driving force which causes the organization to exist.
Mira Krishnan is a social entrepreneur and feminist activist, passionate about the lives of girls and women, early childhood development, and sustainable communities

This event is a partnership with UM Investing in Ability and is part of Investing In Ability Week 2017: Diversity Includes Disability.