ARROWROOT WINE JELLY

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

One cup boiling water, two heaping teaspoons arrow-root, two heaping teaspoons white sugar, one tablespoonful brandy or three tablespoonsful of wine. An excellent corrective to weak bowels.

TAPIOCA JELLY

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Wash the tapioca carefully in two or three waters, then soak it for five or six hours, simmer it then in a stewpan until it becomes quite clear, add a little of the juice of a lemon, wine if desired.

PORT WINE JELLY

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Melt in a little warm water an ounce of isinglass; stir it into a pint of port wine, adding two ounces of sugar candy, an ounce of gum arabic, and half a nutmeg, grated. Mix all well and boil it ten minutes; or till everything is thoroughly dissolved. Then strain it through muslin and set it away to get cold.

PEACH EUTTER

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Take pound for pound of peaches and sugar; cook peaches alone until they become soft, then put in one half the sugar, and stir for one half hour; then the remainder of sugar, and stir an hour and a half. Season with cloves and cinnamon.

LEMON BUTTER

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Beat six eggs, one fourth pound butter, one pound sugar, the rind and juice of three lemons; mixed together and set in a pan of hot water to cook. Very nice for tarts, or to eat with bread.

APPLE BUTTER

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Boil one barrel of new cider down half, peel and core three bushels of good cooking apples; when the cider has boiled to half the quantity, add the apples, and when soft, stir constantly for from eight to ten hours. If done it will adhere to an inverted plate. Put away in stone jars (not earthen ware), covering first with writing-paper cut to fit the jar, and press down closely upon the apple butter; cover the whole with thick brown paper snugly tied down.

CALVES' FEET JELLY

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Should be made at any rate the day before it is required. It is a simple affair to prepare it. Procure a couple of feet and put them on the fire in three quarts of water; let them boil for five hours, during which keep skimming. Pass the liquor through a hair sieve into a basin, and let it firm, after which remove all the oil and fat. Next take a teacupful of water, two wineglassfuls of sherry, the juice of half-a-dozen lemons and the rind of one, the whites and shells of five eggs, half-a-pound of fine white sugar, and whisk the whole till the sugar be melted, then add the jelly, place the whole on the fire in an enameled stew-pan, and keep actively stirring till the composition comes to the boil; pass it twice through a jelly-bag, and then place it in the moulds.

WINE JELLY

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

One box of Cox's gelatine, dissolved in one pint of cold water, one pint of wine, one quart of boiling water, one quart of granulated sugar, and three lemons.

CRAB-APPLE JELLY

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Wash the fruit clean, put in a kettle, cover with water, and boil until thoroughly cooked. Then pour it into a sieve, and let it drain. Do not press it through. For each pint of this liquor allow one pound of sugar. Boil from twenty minutes to half an hour.

OTHER JELLIES. Jellies can be made from quinces, peaches and apples by following the directions for crab-apple jelly.

BLACK-CURRANT JELLY

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Pick each currant individually, and heat the lot in a jar set in boiling water, squeeze as before, and allow a pint of juice to a pound of sugar, a little water may be added if thought proper, or a little red-currant juice. Boil for half an hour, carefully removing the skimmings.

Another way: Clarify the sugar, and add the fruit to it whole, boil for twenty minutes, and strain, then boil a few minutes additional. Pot it and paper it when cool. The refuse berries may be kept as black-currant jam, for tarts, dumplings, etc.

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