To Make a Bird's Nest

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Boil some yellow macaroni gently, until it is quite swelled out and tender, then cut it in pieces, the length of a finger, and lay them on a dish like a straw nest.

Truss pigeons with the heads on, (having scalded and picked them clean,) turned under the left wing, leave the feet on, and having stewed them, arrange them as in a nest; pour the gravy over and serve.

The nest may be made of boiled rice, or bread cut in pieces, the length and thickness of a finger, and fried a nice brown in hot lard, seasoned with pepper and salt. Or, make it of bread, toasted a yellow brown. Any small birds may be stewed or roasted, and served in this way.

Roast Pigeons

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Clean the pigeons, and stuff them the same as chickens; leave the feet on, dip them into scalding water, strip off the skin, cross them, and tie them together below the breast bone; or cut them off; the head may remain on; if so, dip it in scalding water, and pick it clean; twist the wings back, put the liver between the right wing and the body, and turn the head under the other; rub the outside of each bird with a mixture of pepper and salt; spit them, and put some water in the dripping-pan; for each bird put a bit of butter the size of a small egg, put them before a hot fire, and let them roast quickly; baste frequently, half an hour will do them; when nearly done, dredge them with wheat flour and baste with the butter in the pan; turn them, that they may be nicely and easily browned; when done, take them up, set the pan over the fire, make a thin batter of a teaspoonful of wheat flour, and cold water, when the gravy is boiling hot, stir it in; continue to stir it for a few minutes, until it is brown, then pour it through a gravy sieve into a tureen, and serve with the pigeons.

Roast Ducks

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

Wash and dry the ducks carefully. Make a stuffing of sage and onion; insert, and sew up completely that the seasoning may not escape. If tender, ducks do not require more than an hour to roast. Keep them well basted, and a few minutes before serving, dredge lightly with flour, to make them froth and look plump. Send to table hot, with a good brown gravy poured not round but over them. Accompany with currant jelly, and, if in season, green peas.

Quail

Originally Published:
Jubilee Cook Book, 1887
Original Images:

Quail are very nice to stew until nearly done, then roast in the oven to a nice brown, basting frequently with melted butter and water. Serve on soft buttered toast.

Squirrels

Originally Published:
Jubilee Cook Book, 1887
Original Images:
Contributed by: F. A. LYMAN

The following is all I know about cooking squirrels. First catch your squirrel. Skin him, etc. Parboil in a little water in a kettle, add salt, pepper, and enough butter to fry it brown. Then eat. If the animal is tough parboil a little more till he is tender.

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Broiled Quail

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: ALDEAN CHAPIN, Muscatine, Iowa

Split down the back, dry well with a cloth, place on the broiler over a clean fire turning frequently. Allow them to cook slowly. It requires a little more than 30 minutes to cook nice and brown. When done place on a hot plate, season with salt and pepper. Lay bits of butter on the birds. Each bird should then be placed on buttered toast and served with tart jelly and bread sauce.

Roast Duck---3

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:

Contributed by: MRS. RUFUS WAPLES

Dressing---One onion minced fine, 1 large sour apple cut in medium sized pieces, stale bread crumbs, with small cup of butter thoroughly mixed with bread crumbs, salt and pepper. Rub inside of fowl with lemon juice before adding dressing. Roast in quick oven until tender. If there is an excess of oil pour some off before making brown gravy. Serve with baked apples.

Roast Ducks---2

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: MRS. MOTLEY

Lay them in salt and water for an hour or so after they are drawn. Make a dressing of bread crumbs, mashed potatoes, one onion chopped fine, a little summer savory, salt and pepper. Put the ducks into the dripping pan and cover with water. Let them boil 10 minutes, then turn off the water and add sufficient to baste with. When almost done dredge with flour, and lay on some pieces of butter to brown them. Make the gravy from the pan with the giblets cooked and chopped fine.

Roast Ducks---1

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: MRS. M. H. KERNGOOD

Singe off all small feathers, wash thoroughly, rub well with salt, ginger and a little pepper, inside and out. Prepare the following dressing: Take the livers, gizzards and hearts and chop to a powder in chopping bowl. Grate in a little nutmeg, add a piece of celery root, 1/2 an onion and a tomato. Put all this into your chopping bowl, soak some stale bread, squeeze out all the water and fry in spider of hot fat, throw this soaked bread into the bowl, add 1 or 2 eggs, salt, pepper and a speck of ginger. Mix all thoroughly, fill this in the ducks and sew up. Lay in the roasting pan with slices of onions, celery and tomatoes and specks of fat. Put this on top of fowl. Roast covered up tight and baste often. Roast 2 hours.

Roast Goose

Originally Published:
Ann Arbor Cookbook, 1904
Original Images:
Contributed by: MRS. R. WAPLES

Soak in salt water 2 hours before cooking. Make a mashed
potato dressing seasoned with onion, butter, pepper and salt.
Fill the body of the goose, grease it all over well with butter
and dredge with flour. Place in a pan with a pint of water, baste
well and cook 2 hours. Serve with onion gravy and apple sauce.

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