English Herb Bread

Originally Published:
Fare Thee Well, 1974
Original Images:
Contributed by: Beth Chase Cunningham

1 pkg. granulated yeast (1 T.)
2 eggs (well beaten)
2 c. milk
1 tsp. nutmeg
1/4 c. sugar
2 tsp. dried crumbled sage
1 T. salt
4 tsp. caraway seed
1/4 c. butter or margarine
1 tsp. celery seed
6 c. flour (about)

Scald milk. Add butter, sugar and salt. Stir until butter is melted. Let cool until lukewarm. Add yeast. Stir in eggs and spices. With wooden spoon mix in 3 c. of flour and beat until smooth. Blend in rest of flour gradually, kneading it by hand until smooth and elastic. Place in greased bowl, turning dough over once to grease surface. Cover with damp cloth. Keep dough at 80 to 85 degrees until double in bulk (about 2 hours). Punch down, divide into two equal parts. Let rest a few minutes. Make into two loaves. Place in (9x5x3) inch loaf pans.

Let rise in warm place till double. Bake 10 minutes at 425 degrees then about 30 minutes at 375 degrees. To test doneness, turn load out of pan and thump bottom with knuckles; loaf will sound hollow when done. Cool thoroughly on rack (turn loaf on side) before wrapping. Can also be baked in miniature loaf pans (made of heavy aluminum foil and available at hardware stores). These are nice for a cocktail party. Excellent with cheese, turkey or roast beef.

This recipe was given to me by a wonderful English lady, Bea Watson.

Anadama Bread

Originally Published:
Fare Thee Well, 1974
Original Images:
Contributed by: Elspeth Cahill Swope

(A down East recipe, with apocryphal anecdote attached)

1 1/2 c. water
1 1/2 T. shortening
1 tsp. salt
1 cake yeast
1/3 c. yellow corn meal
1/4 c. lukewarm water
1/3 c. molasses
4 to 4 1/2 c. flour (sifted)

Bring water to boil in saucepan; add salt. A surer way to keep it from lumping, I have found, is to mix the 1/2 c. water with the cornmeal and then stir into the 1 c. boiling salted water. Remove from heat; pour into a large bowl. Add shortening and molasses and cool to lukewarm. Add yeast to the 1/4 c. lukewarm water, blend well. Mix yeast into corn meal mixture; add the sifted flour. Knead until smooth (Use more flour if needed). Let rise until double in bulk. Punch down and mold into loaf. Place in (9x5x3) inch loaf pan for 1 loaf, or use several smaller bread loaf pans. Let rise until double in bulk. Brush top with melted butter; sprinkle with corn meal and salt. Bake 1 hour at 375 degrees, till golden brown and bottom crust gives a hollow sound when rapped. Makes excellent toast!

And now for that anecdote:
A crotchety old Main lumberjack and his wife, Anna, were forever arguing. Finally she got so mad at him that she refused to cook anything but corn meal mush with molasses poured over for all his meals.
Equally furious, he took those ingredients and made himself a loaf of bread, which he took with him for his noon meal in the woods. He shared this loaf with his buddies, who enjoyed it and asked him what he called it. His answer: "I call it Anna-dammer!"

Oatmeal Bread

Originally Published:
Fare Thee Well, 1974
Original Images:
Contributed by: Jane Lockwood Barney

OATMEAL BREAD

2 c. oatmeal
3 1/2 c. boiling water
2 cakes of yeast (dissolved in 1/2 c. water plus a pinch of sugar)
2/3 c. brown sugar
4 tsp. salt
11 c. flour
1/2 c. oil
1 T. plus molasses

Place in large mixing bowl oatmeal, brown sugar, salt, oil and molasses. Pour boiling water over it, stir and let stand until lukewarm. Pour in dissolved yeast, add flour and knead thoroughly until smooth and elastic. Cover and let rise in a warm place until double in bulk (I turn my oven on briefly, turn it off and place rising bread in it). Punch or stir enough to remove bubbles and let rise again.

Turn out on floured board, knead briefly, shape into loaves, rub with a little vegetable oil, and place in oiled loaf pans. Cover loaves with a cloth and let rise until double in size. Bake in 325 to 350 degree oven for about 40 minutes. Turn out on cake rack and let cool.

Makes 3 loaves, under 2 lb. each.

Oatmeal Bread

Originally Published:
Fare Thee Well, 1974
Original Images:
Contributed by: Beth Chase Cunningham

4 hours to prepare.

3 c. oatmeal (quick cooking)
1 c. cold water (not instant)
3 packets granular yeast (dissolved in 1 c. warm water)
4 c. boiling water
2 t. salt
9 c. flour (preferably unbleached)
1/2 stick butter or margarine
2/3 c. light molasses

Mix oatmeal, boiling water, salt and butter together in large bowl (I use an 8 quart stainless steel bowl). Let cool to lukewarm. Add, mixing with wooden spoon, molasses, cold water, yeast. Add flour last, 1 c. at a time (about 9 c.). Knead well. Let rise. Punch down. Make into 3 large loaves. (Place in (9x5x3) inch loaf pans. Let rise. Bake at 400 degrees first 15 minutes, then at 375 degrees until loaf sounds hollow when thumped on bottom; about 25 minutes. Turn out of pans. Let cool on sides.

LEMON BREAD (A SWEET BREAD)

Originally Published:
Fare Thee Well, 1974
Original Images:
Contributed by: Elizabeth Cornwall

1/2 c. shortening
1/2 c. milk
1 c. granulated sugar
Rind from 1 lemon
2 eggs
1/2 c. walnuts (chopped)
1 1/2 c. all-purpose flour
1/3 c. sugar
1 tsp. baking powder
Juice from 1 lemon
1 tsp. salt

Cream shortening and sugar together. Add eggs and beat thorougly. Mix flour, baking powder and salt and add alternately with milk. Mix in lemon rind and nuts. Pour into greased and floured bread tins and bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes. Mix lemon juice and 1/3 c. sugar and drizzle over top of bread while the bread is hot.
Makes 1 loaf.

DOUGHNUTS

Originally Published:
Everyday Cookbook, Unknown
Original Images:

One cup of sugar, two eggs, two tablespoons of melted butter, two thirds cup of milk, two even teaspoons of cream tartar, one even teaspoon of soda, flour enough to roll, salt and nutmeg.

Date Bread

Originally Published:
Eastern Star Cookbook, 1923
Original Images:

Pit 1 cup dates, cut in halves, add 2 tablespoonfuls sugar and large tablespoonful butter substitute and work into bread dough. Put in pan, let rise and bake in a slow oven. It may be served hot or cold and makes excellent sandwiches with a nut or fig filling.

Doughnuts

Originally Published:
Eastern Star Cookbook, 1923
Original Images:
Contributed by: Stella Horner.

One cup sugar, 3 eggs, beaten light and together; 3 full tablespoonfuls melted butter, 1 cup milk, a little salt, 3 heaping teaspoonfuls Royal baking powder, 4 cups flour, or until stiff enough, and roll out. Flavor with nutmeg or any preferred flavoring.

Corn Fritters

Originally Published:
Eastern Star Cookbook, 1923
Original Images:
Contributed by: Mrs. Wm. Lewis

Cut corn from 1/2 dozen ears of cooked corn, 2 eggs, well beaten, 1 teaspoonful Royal baking powder, 3/4 cup sweet milk, salt, and add enough ground crackers to make a thin batter. Drop by spoonful on a well greased griddle.

Cornmeal Ginger Bread

Originally Published:
Eastern Star Cookbook, 1923
Original Images:

Mix two cups yellow cornmeal, 1/2 cup molasses, 1 cup sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls shortening, 1 teaspoonful salt, 1 cup of sour and 1 cup of sweet milk together in a double boiler and cook over hot water for about 10 minutes after the mixture has become hot. Let cool, add 1 cup wheat flour and 1 1/2 teaspoonfuls soda, 1 teaspoonful cinnamon and 1/2 teaspoonful each ginger and cloves, sifted together, then 1 egg well beaten.

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